Gabi Aguero

2009 Spicer Winner

spicer_aguero.jpgGabi Aguero was born in Cordoba, Argentina. She then immigrated to Canada where she has lived for more than half of her life. Gabriela has finished coursework at the University of Manitoba in Canada and will be hopefully commencing fieldwork in a year or two. During that time she hopes to train in film in Winnipeg to develop her training as an artist with an added ethnographic component. Gabi holds a B.F.A. Honours from the University of Manitoba and a M.F.A from Louisiana State University.  She held a Canada Council Grant for emerging artists and was funded by the Organization of American States through graduate art school. Her career as an artist was on its way with shows around the world and several awards, but Gabi took the next fifteen years off to concentrate on mothering her four children (no degree was awarded here). During that period she worked as a peace activist teaching workshops, organizing peace events and doing graduate work for a PhD in conflict resolution that she left for anthropology while reading ethnography of children in war. Her present research entitled Children Making Movies in Colombia: Budding Grassroots’ Activism Peacebuilding with Imagination will explore through participatory collaborative methodologies how children craft their political, social and lived worlds amidst conflict. The children’s audiovisual school is located in southwestern Colombia. Gabi met the children through a blog while writing a paper on peace, art and war in Colombia to be presented at a conference and it was love at first e-mail. The children and Gabi are involved in several collaborative art projects worldwide and have plans to do a collaborative ethnographic film as part of her dissertation. They met last summer during the inauguration of the new school building and keep in touch through the web on a daily basis.

 

Dana E. Powell

2009 Spicer Winner

spicer_powell.jpgDana E. Powell is currently a Royster Fellow and PhD Candidate in the Department of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. She received her B.A. in Religious Studies from Guilford College and her M.A. in Anthropology from UNC-Chapel Hill. Her research interests include the anthropology of North America, ethnography of development, political ecology, social movements, science and technology studies, feminism, identity and subjectivity, critical indigenous studies, and engaged scholarship. Her dissertation project is on the cultural politics of energy development on the Navajo Nation in the U.S. Southwest and the ways in which specific environmental controversies become sites for understanding different regimes of knowledge and nature. Dana has received support for her graduate studies from the National Science Foundation, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, the Jacobs Fund, and both the University Center for International Studies and The Graduate School at UNC-Chapel Hill. In addition to her research, coursework, and teaching, she is an active member of the Social Movements Working Group and the Center for Integrating Research and Action (CIRA) at UNC-Chapel Hill.