Amy Cooper

2007 Spicer Winner

spicer_cooper.jpgAmy Cooper is a Ph.D. student in the University of Chicago’s Department of Comparative Human Development. She received her B.S. in Foreign Service from Georgetown University in 1998, and completed a Master’s degree in social sciences at the University of Chicago in 2004. Amy is training in cultural anthropology at the University of Chicago, focusing on the anthropology of health and medicine in Latin America. In 2004, Amy traveled to Havana, Cuba, where she conducted research for her Master’s paper on Cuban reactions to an uncertain future, focusing on how those reactions are manifested in discourses of stress, anxiety, and depression. There she became interested in Cuban models of community health and in Cuban medical diplomacy abroad, and particularly interested in how Cuban models were being appropriated and adapted in other Latin American countries. Thus, in 2006, Amy traveled to Venezuela to study the transformations in public health programs, and the complex relations between the Venezuelan state and its citizens upon which these programs act. Her dissertation will investigate these community based public health programs as state projects of social change in Caracas. She is focusing on how individuals, marginalized communities, and the Venezuelan state mobilize a discourse of ‘social reintegration’ in an attempt to transform neighborhoods and produce healthy citizens.

 

Namino Glantz

2007 Spicer Winner

spicer_glantz.jpgNamino Glantz’ interest in culture and equity was born during her residence on the Navajo Nation in Arizona (1983-1987).  Having spent her childhood in New England, her family’s move to the reservation marked a life turning point.  For the first time, she lived among a minority group while living as a minority herself, one of few non-Navajo teens in the heart of the reservation.  She learned about discrimination and diversity, balance and beauty, listening, and learning itself.  Her interest in anthropology surged. Ms. Glantz’ B.A. in anthropology from Stanford University provided her with academic depth and the opportunity to live and do research in Santiago, Chile (1990) and Chiapas, Mexico (1989-1992), with guidance from anthropologist-Latin Americanist George A. Collier.  During her subsequent long-term residence (1994-2000) in Comitán, Chiapas, Ms. Glantz worked as a researcher and project coordinator at a non-profit center for health research (Centro de Investigaciones en Salud de Comitán, CISC).  Years of work on equity in health prompted her to complement practical experience with focused instruction in medical anthropology, public health, international health, and gender, via an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Arizona under the mentorship of medical anthropologist Mark Nichter.  As an applied medical anthropologist, Ms. Glantz now strives to understand the role of culture in health, illness, and healing, and apply this insight to improve well-being.  For her Ph.D., she returned to Chiapas to address the emerging need for elder health research and intervention.  She used formative research to initiate local dialogue about elder health needs and engaged local social scientists, service providers, and elders as co-collaborators in elder health service reforms.