Judy Anderson
2010 Del Jones Award Winner

jones_anderson.jpgJudy Anderson is a native of Liberia who grew up in Dallas, Texas. She first became interested in Black identities in Argentina as a Rotary Ambassadorial Scholar in 2000.  As a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Florida, she revisited Buenos Aires in 2005 for preliminary dissertation research on inter-ethnic relations between Africans and Afro-descendents in present day Argentina and in 2007 to conduct dissertation research.  During this time she worked closely with Black community leaders, scholars, representatives of local and international state institutions, and other residents.  She continues to be engaged with these communities and looks forward to helping them realize a variety of projects in the future.  
Judy Anderson

 

Christie Shrestha
2010 Del Jones Award Winner

jones_shrestha.jpgMoving to Richmond, KY from Kathmandu, Nepal at age twelve was anything but an ordinary experience. To say that the move from a capital metropolitan city to a small town was a drastic cultural change during those adolescent years would be an understatement. Nonetheless, like many people, I survived those adolescent years full of confusion and trying to figure out where I belonged. As these early years shaped my understanding of the U.S. racialization processes, they also pushed me to strive for the best. I graduated from high school with a Common Wealth Diploma and as a valedictorian of my class.

Since my parents are settled in KY, I decided to stay close to home and attended Berea College in Berea, KY – another smaller town. I majored in Biology, Pre-Med with a minor in Spanish. Of course, as a “model minority,” I thought I would be going to medical school. However, the diverse experiences I received at Berea College, a liberal arts school, slowly changed my interests. Those early formative years shaped my interest and understanding in issues related to social justice. Hence, after Berea, I decided to go into Public Health. I earned a Masters degree in Public Health from George Washington University. During those years when I was pursuing my MPH, I had many wonderful learning experiences and opportunities. For instance, as part of my practicum I interned at PAHO/WHO for a year. I also interned one summer at White Ribbon Alliance and at Disability Rights Dept. in Civil Rights Division (Dept. of Justice). On the side, I also worked as a part-time bilingual advocate for Asian/Pacific Islander Domestic Violence Resource Project. All of these public health experiences shaped my perception and understanding of social inequalities and various processes of marginalization.

Post Washington, DC, I came back to Lexington, Kentucky and worked for a year and half as Clinical Research Coordinator at the University of Kentucky. During this time, I took a course in Medical Anthropology. Suddenly, it seemed that I could articulate what I had been experiencing and observing about the social issues all those years. It was as if I have uncovered a wealth of vocabulary to articulate my feelings. This was also when I realized that Anthropology is the venue that I had been searching for through my various internship positions. Currently, I am in a MA/PhD program in Medical Anthropology. I am writing my thesis for my second Masters degree. My research study, part of which I will be presenting at the SfAA 2010 Annual Meeting, is on the resettlement processes of Bhutanese refugees who have been resettled in Lexington, KY.