Eric J. Bailey, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Eric Bailey Global Cultures Photo 2015.jpgDr. Eric J. Bailey (Ph.D., 1988 Wayne State University, M.P.H. 1996 Emory University) is a joint-appointed Professor of Anthropology and Public Health at East Carolina University (N.C.). Dr. Bailey is Director of the Ethnic and Rural Health Disparities (ERHD) Graduate Certificate Online program (www.ecu.edu/erhd) and Director of the new Global Public Health Study Abroad program in the Department of Public Health (http://piratesabroad.ecu.edu?go=MPHGlobal). Trained as an applied cultural and medical anthropologist, Dr. Bailey has broad-based research experience in several health issues and chronic diseases including hypertension, diabetes, prenatal care, cancer, alternative medicine, HIV/AIDs and has published research findings in scholarly journals and lectured for the past 25 years on issues related to medical anthropology, multicultural and multiethnic health care utilization, alternative, ethnic health and health disparities, community health, race and ethnic relations, and culturally-competent health programs. Dr. Bailey was a former Assistant and Associate Professor at the University of Houston, Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis (IUPUI), the University of Arkansas Medical Sciences (UAMS), and Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science. Dr. Bailey has also worked for the National Institutes of Health (1999-2004) as a Health Scientist Administrator and Program Director in the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Comprehensive Minority Biomedical Branch (CMBB) and the National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NCMHD) in Bethesda, MD. Dr. Bailey has received federal funding to assist in the training of health professionals in the ERHD program and conducted public health training programs for program directors at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Dr. Bailey has published seven academic books and fourteen peer-reviewed journal articles. His forthcoming book, “Race and Ethnic Relations on Campus: Understanding, Empowerment, and Solutions for College Students,” presents brand-new race and ethnic relations solution strategies for college students and universities in the United States. He is also contributing reviewer to the Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities.

Statement

I am truly honored to be considered as a candidate for President of the Society for Applied Anthropology. I have been an applied cultural and medical anthropologist since 1988 when I graduated from the applied anthropology program of Wayne State University (Detroit, MI). Learning my applied anthropology approach from renowned mentors such as Cultural Anthropologist Dr. Bernice Kaplan and nurse Anthropologist & Founder of Transcultural Nursing Dr. Madeleine Leininger, I sought to establish my career as an anthropologist who could build bridges to other scholarly disciplines and to other professional occupations for the purpose of expanding the practical applications of anthropology.

As I recall when I was a junior professor traveling with my mentors to York, England to present my applied research at the Society of Applied Anthropology meetings in the spring of 1990, I felt honored to be a part of their professional world as well as being a contributing applied anthropologist to the SfAA meetings that year. This international, global SfAA meeting meant the world to me because it motivated me to aspire and imagine more of the far-reaching possibilities of applied anthropology.

After establishing myself as an applied anthropologist and Assistant/Associate Professor at the University of Houston (1988-1990) and Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis (1990-1998), I decided to immerse myself into another field of study and occupation – public health. That was the reason why I accepted a Postdoctoral Fellowship at Emory University in 1993 to earn a Master’s degree in Public Health in 1996 while also working in the Office of Minority Health at the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention in Atlanta. This training in public health and my research in HIV/AIDS along with my applied anthropology training provided me an opportunity to work at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for five years as a Health Scientist Administrator and Program Director.

For the past 12 years, I have been a joint-appointed Professor of Anthropology and Public Health at East Carolina University (NC). I am also Founder and Director of the Ethnic and Rural Health Disparities (ERHD) Graduate Certificate Online program which trains all types of graduate professionals on how to conduct public health research and develop culturally competent health programs for specific ethnic and rural populations in the United States and globally.        

After all my 30 years of applied research, applied programming, scholarly books, journal publications, and service on university/professional/community-based committees, what truly motivates me today are my students! Seeing, listening, talking, interacting, discussing, and mentoring my undergraduate and graduate students of all various backgrounds encourages me to want to do more for them. I believe that I could be a great spokesperson, mentor, representative, leader, and trail-blazer for my students and all applied anthropologists if given an opportunity to serve as President of the Society for Applied Anthropology.

My mission would be to continue to do the phenomenal programming, research, scholarly and applied activities that the society does for all as well as encourage more collaborative and global partnerships so that the SfAA can continue to grow and give the new upcoming applied anthropologists more opportunities to use their perspectives and skills in solving the world issues.